Arcane Meets: Swedish-Iranian R&B Vocalist, Ayelle. “I love how music can help people process their feelings.”

In this editon of “Arcane Meets” we are introduced to the Iranian-Swedish R&B Vocalist, Ayelle. Most known for her soft vocals and melodic cadences, Ayelle has been the artist to watch for the last five years. The electronic-r&b artist, who is currently based in the UK, made time to talk to Arcane about her introduction to music, the hardships she has faced since being thrust into stardom and much more!

Enjoy the interview.


Ayelle 01.png“I’ve always been able to adapt quickly and pick myself back up…”

 

Before we begin, would you like to introduce yourself?

A: Sure! I’m Ayelle, I’m 24 years old and I make electronic r&b/pop. I’m half Swedish/Iranian and I grew up in Sweden and Spain but now live in the UK.

 

I personally know you to be an R&B artist, but with the amount of music you’ve released since debuting in 2015, some may consider you an Electronic-R&B, and some don’t even label you. I’m curious to know what genre you consider your general sound to be? (if you even affiliate with one)

A: Yep, I would also call it electronic r&b/pop haha. Genres are getting so ambiguous these days though so you can never be sure of what you’re actually making, people will always have  a different idea of what it is to them. I just like to experiment with my voice and quirky sounds.

 

Growing up in London, I’m curious to know what type of music influenced you. Who were some of the artists you gravitated towards in your youth? Are there any in particular you can pinpoint that influence your personal sound? 

A: I’m a 90s baby so I grew up listening to Britney,  Shakira and Beyonce haha. Beyonce was definitely a huge early influence on me as well as this Mariah Carey and Whitney Houston CD that my mom and I would sing along to religiously. Since my dad’s Iranian there was also a lot of persian music in the house growing up which I feel had more of a subconscious influence on my singing techniques and oriental influences.

 

Ayelle, Machine.

As I mentioned earlier, you debuted in 2015, but it wasn’t until 2016 that audiences discovered Ayelle, the artist with your debut project Machine. Can you remember some of the emotions, thoughts, etc. that you felt while creating the project?

A: It was both a very overwhelming and somewhat underwhelming process for me. Overwhelming in the sense that I didn’t have a specific producer I was working with so all of the songs were randomly pieced together with demos and different producers and I worked really hard at still trying to create something cohesive.

I definitely had very unrealistic expectations at that time since it was early days for me, so the release felt underwhelming when those expectations weren’t met. But I’ve always been able to adapt quickly and pick myself back up so that’s what I did and just carried on. I’m still proud of that early project though and I learnt so many valuable lessons from that.

 

Because this was your first project, did you have any goals that you wanted to meet?

A: The goals I had set for the project were different from what I actually got out of it, which I think were some very important lessons about how the industry works.  It equipped me with knowledge that I wouldn’t otherwise have been able to attain. I also got my first big blog premiere and playlist placement on Spotify which was definitely a good step in the right direction.

 

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“The whole reason I started making music in the first place was to be able to process my own feelings…”

 

Your lead single “Machine” quickly gained success surpassing over 30,000 plays (on SoundCloud alone); with this being your first project, did you hope for a response like this; and was it somewhat gratifying to know that this many people enjoyed your music?

A: As I mentioned before,  I had very unrealistic expectations about the project and although it made me super happy that people were listening to and enjoying the music, I didn’t realise just how much work there was still to be done, that it was only the beginning.

 

Looking back on the time between Machine’s release and right now, what part of being an artist has been the most gratifying (thus far)?

A: Being able to support myself off music is honestly such a huge blessing. It allows me to focus on making the best art I can possibly make and to navigate this industry with a healthy mindset and lifestyle, something which was very hard to do whilst I was still working a dayjob. Of course the core of why I do this and the most gratifying experience of all is when people reach out and let you know how a song has touched them or helped them through something. I love how music can help people process their feelings.

The whole reason I started making music in the first place was to be able to process my own feelings, so the fact that the songs can do that for others too feels incredible.

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Within a month of release your debut project, you had already begun releasing singles and collaborations; songs like “Reclaim” and “Take Your Time” (prod. Osmo) quickly gaining popularity. With every song that you’ve released, has it ever gotten to a point where it’s hard to remain creative (influenced)? If so, how do you normally get through those times?

A: I’ve been blessed with a constant flow of inspiration in my life so I’ve luckily never had writers block. I don’t think my way to my songs, I kind of let them write themselves. I call it “subconscious writing” because often I don’t know what I’m writing about when I start a new song and as I explore my feelings further the meaning of the song unfolds.

 

By 2017, you had released a ton of collaborations with producers and solo work, but if I’m correct you also released your first song with a featuring artist: “Rush”, featuring Nakala. How did this collaboration come about?

A: I had heard Nakala’s song ‘Paris’ and fell in love with it so I reached out. She works out of a studio in Portsmouth with a producer called Brad Baker so I started going there a lot and working with them, we all get on really well and love working together 🙂

 

Even in 2019, Nakala remains the only singer-songwriter you’ve brought into your world of music. Are there any other musicians you think would mesh with your sound?

A: Yes, this year I’ve got upcoming collaborations with Akacia, Naji and Mothica and hopefully lots more to come!

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“I think who I am as an artist is ever evolving…”

 

As of 2019, you’ve released two projects, two joint projects, countless singles and features. I’m curious to know what some of your goals for the year are?

A: I’m releasing a single every month and putting together some visuals and just focusing on creating consistent high quality music and content.

 

You recently released two singles “NBDY” and “Obvious” could we potentially hear these songs on a project later in the year?; and for those who have yet to hear, can you briefly explain what both songs are about?

A:  They won’t be going on a project as they’re part of the 12 singles I’m releasing this year. Next year however I do have a 10 track EP on the horizon!

The recent singles are quite different as one is about more recent events in my life and the other one draws inspiration from events that happened quite long ago now but that still hurt nonetheless. Obvious is about being in a long distance relationship and wanting to make sure you both remember how much you love each other. NBDY is about domestic abuse and the patterns of both mental and physical abuse which break down your sense of self worth.

 

With every song you create, do you come closer to knowing who you want to be as an artist, and knowing how you would like your music to affect people?

A: I think who I am as an artist is ever evolving, every time I think I’ve come close I start changing again haha. All i know is that I wanna make music that speaks to people on various levels and is able to help people process their emotions and grow.

 

As I mentioned, 2019 marks four years under your belt, do you think you’ve grown (creatively, musically). Are there any words of wisdom you can give up and coming musicians?

A: Yeah absolutely. It can’t be compared haha. My advice would be to educate yourself about all aspects of the industry, through asking questions and always being an active part of your artist project even when you have a team around you. It’s invaluable to understanding the choices you’re making and the consequences.

 

Lastly, is there something you would like to tell your supporters?

A: remember to self care ❤


If you enjoyed this interview and would like to learn more about Ayelle, be sure to follow her on her social media platforms, Instagram and Twitter. For those interested in hearing more music from Ayelle, including songs mentioned in the interview, make sure to support her on SoundCloud, Spotify, and all streaming platforms available!

Arcane Meets: Isold. “I don’t consider myself as an influencer, I’m just trying to do what’s right.”

For the first interview of the year, OA had the privilege of connecting with Icelandic beauty, Ísold Halldórudóttir. The body-positive artist and model, who gained traction in 2017 as a model for LOVE Magazine, has used her platform to spread inclusivity since the very beginning. In today’s interview, we had the privilege of discussing the importance of diversity in the fashion world, defying beauty standards, and much more…

Enjoy the interview!

 


 

Q: Before we begin, would you like to introduce yourself?

A: Hi, my name is Ísold. I’m a model, artist and activist from Reykjavik, Iceland.

 

 

Q: Let’s start from the beginning; your origin is in Iceland correct? Iceland has been described as one of the most progressive countries in the world as well as one of the best countries for women equality. How do you think growing up in this type of environment influenced you?

A: Well, I didn’t. Me and my mom moved to Copenhagen when I was around 7 or 8 and I didn’t move back to Iceland till I was 16. My mom has always been very vocal about the importance of equality.

Being a feminist from the moment she was born, she raised me to believe that I could do anything I wanted to, regardless of my gender; and while Iceland has progressed a lot further than many others, I feel that we still have a long way to go.  

 

 

Q: You’ve used your platforms as model, artist, and activist to push the idea of showcasing diversity and inclusivity. Growing up, is this a subject you were always vocal about, or did it gradually happen the more you got into the industry?

A: From an early age I knew I didn’t fit in, literally.I was too different because I was too fat.  It wasn’t until after I started modelling that I realised how much of a voice I had, or could have.

I’m not doing this JUST for me, I’m representing everyone that’s ever been made to feel that they’re ugly because of their size, or that they don’t belong in this society because they’re “different”.

 

Q: In an interview with i-D, you explained that there were certain standards that made you feel that you weren’t beautiful; I’m curious as to how you got yourself out of that mindset?

A: We have to accept our insecurities so that we can let go of them. Only then will you realise that your “flaws” aren’t real.  

Ask yourself who’s profiting from these emotions? Ask yourself why you think your cellulite defines how beautiful you are, or why you feel it is almost a necessity to have a flat stomach. It’s not you, it’s them. We’ve been manipulated to think everything is wrong with us. There’s nothing wrong with you, you’re perfect.

 

 

Q: You’ve used social media as a way to push your movement of body positivity. I’m curious, are there any influencers that you look up to/are inspired by?

A: Oh of course! I would have to give a huge shout out to La’shaunae.  She’s so fucking inspiring and honest about everything that she does. I truly admire her, she’s gonna change the world.

I recently discovered Lotte Vaneijk on Instagram, she’s a plus size model ( even though I hate using that word because I find it so degrading ) and while fighting for diversity in the industry, she does it in a way without attacking anyone, and I find that really important, and so pure.

Also, Lucinda Graham. She’s so inspiring to how she presents herself and the way she raises awareness to mental health. There should be no shame about taking care of yourself and she truly makes sure to let her everyone know that.

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Q: Social media is actually the reason I discovered you! In 2017, you were photographed by Kendall Jenner for the #LOVEME17 Campaign – what was that experience like; especially with it being your first modeling experience?

A: That was such a surreal moment, yet I still can’t believe it happened. I never considered being a model.  It seemed like such a unrealistic dream. Not because I didn’t find myself beautiful, but because I was fat.

So to get that opportunity, was so overwhelming and empowering at the same time. I had no idea what I was doing, and I was super uncomfortable, but it opened my eyes to something so much bigger than just me.

 

 

Q: How do you think you’ve grown as a person/model since that shoot? Are you now more/less comfortable in front of the camera? What are some tips you could give aspiring models?

A: Definitely more…

My mom being a photographer was always taking pictures of me when I was little, but after graduating from high school I had to completely start from scratch. I didn’t know who I was anymore, so I really found myself when I started modelling, and remembered the comfort and the normality of being in front of the camera.

You have to be uncontrollably ruthless to be able to survive in this industry. That’s what everyone tells me. I call bullshit. Be whoever you want to be. In today’s world there are no rules, there’s no “how to” book, all you have to do to succeed, is believe in yourself. That’s it.

 

 

Q: In being so open and honest about your journey of self love & raising awareness about the lack of diversity in the industry (specifically fashion), you have become a source of light for those who feel underappreciated/valued, at least when it comes to society’s beauty standards. What is the overall mission?

A:  I don’t consider myself as an influencer, I’m just trying to do what’s right. No one should ever feel that they’re ugly.  All of us are so special because of our individuality, we all deserve to feel that we belong, and that’s the mission.

To whisper, no to shout, to all those little girls that are out there right now comparing themselves to each other, arguing, crying, fighting about who’s prettier, who’s fatter, who’s the “it girl” that it doesn’t matter. That there is no such thing as ugly. There is no such thing as flaws or imperfections.

 

Q: Lastly, is there anything you would like to tell your supporters?

A: I love you. Really.  And to anyone that’s fighting for their dreams, their sexuality, their identity, I support you and I believe in you.


 

If you would like to stay updated on Isold’s journey as an activist and model, feel free to follow her on Instagram 🙂

Make sure to follow OA on social media platforms: Instagram, Twitter, and Soundcloud to stay updated.

Meet Upcoming Australian Producer: Tokyo Twilight. “…stepping back sometimes and living in the moment is refreshingly healthy…”

When I created OA, my only goal was to help upcoming creators. I didn’t know how it would work, and I definitely had no idea how far it would spread – but thanks to you, the readers – I have been able to speak to some of the most talented visionaries worldwide.

For example, in this interview, I get the chance to speak with upcoming producer and DJ: Tokyo Twilight, from Brisbane, Australia. A musician since birth, Tokyo, whose influences include people like British producer, Bonobo, has gotten attention from music platforms such as Dynmk (music channel based on YouTube) and over 40,000 plays for his latest song “Little Things” in just under a week.

Although he’s relatively young, he’s already realized that this is a trying industry and that although it’s important to stay consistent, it’s just as important to “live in the moment.”

In this interview, I got the chance to discuss the backstory behind the name, the success of Little Things, and much more!

Enjoy…


Q: Before we begin, would you like to introduce yourself?

A: Hey! I’m Jack. I’m a musician/DJ, and I live in Brisbane, Australia.  

 

Q: Is there a backstory behind your name? If so, explain.

A: I went to Japan about 4 years ago I think? Anyways I was on the flight back to Australia during Twilight, and for whatever reason, the full moon was nestled behind the skyscrapers of Tokyo in the distance, and the name Tokyo Twilight just popped into my head!

 

Q: You’ve used words such as “ambient-electronic” to describe your music; Who are some of the musicians (artists, producers, etc.) that influenced this sound?

A: It always depends what I’m listening to! But my biggest influence would have to be Bonobo, I’m in love with the way he combines electronic and organic soundscapes into one piece, it’s makes it sound so orchestral and grand, but also stays true to the electronic elements.

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Q: You’re relatively young, were you always attracted towards the arts? (specifically music) Does your family have a musical background?

A: I’ve been going strong since I could walk haha, I’ve always loved dancing to music, so anytime any Michael Jackson came on, the people around me would always get a show! I only really started to write music about 3 or 4 years ago, however things have become more serious and promising in this past year.

 

Q:  I’ve previously interviewed an audio engineer, can you explain to me what the differences between an engineer and a producer are? (Is producing more about making a beat, creating the “whole picture”, etc.)

A: Yeah, it’s actually very different process with the same intended outcome, which is to make something sound nice. A producer specifically focuses on the content and sounds of the music, and a sound engineer focuses on making that content sound the best it can.

 

Q: At what age did you get into producing? What made you gravitate towards it?

A: I got into producing around when I was 13 I think, I just started messing around on GarageBand, and then found Ableton which is what I use now. I was listening to a lot of Daft Punk and really wanted to do the same thing.
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Q: If I’m correct, the first song you released (that featured vocals) “Little Things (ft. DVNA) came out over the summer. What was the creation process of that song?

A: Yeah it was! With vocals at least. I’ve released quite a few tracks here and there beforehand but “Little Things” has been the start of what I’ve always wanted to do.

Basically, I had this chord idea and vocal hook I had been picking at for ages, and eventually I decided to send it to my good friend Dana (DVNA). She took the idea and transformed it into this amazing vocal performance and threw in some nice production ideas too, then it was an uphill journey of ideas that just kept flowing. We actually didn’t see each other in person the whole writing process, the power of the internet!

 

Q: Do you think you will collaborate with more artists in the future? Do you have any dream collaborations?

A: I’ve been listening to this LA based rapper Duckwrth lately, I love his flow and his tone, so yeah i’d love to do something with him one day!

 

Q: Since its release, the song has been played over 4,000 times on SoundCloud alone, featured on one of the biggest music platforms on YouTube: DYNMK. Did you think that the song would explode like it did when you made it?

A: I sort of made this song with the intent of appealing to pop lovers, my comfort zone of writing usually consists of more ambient sounds. I didn’t expect this one to get so much love, so I’m super thankful for it!

 

Q: You released the song during one of your shows, do you remember what the response was like? Were you nervous beforehand?

A: It’s tricky cause I tend to get in my own little bubble while I’m playing, and I usually forget to take a look up from my instruments haha! However, I had heaps of people come up and say that was their favourite of the night, so I was super humbled.

 

Q: You’ve actually held a number of shows since your debut, how do you usually prepare for them?

A: I’m pretty lazy when it comes to rehearsals haha, I usually just do a quick runthrough of my songs the night before and check that all my synths & samples are working cohesively with the tracks. I’ve been lucky to not get stage fright before shows, so that helps keep me calm.

 

Q: Now, you’re currently based in Brisbane (Australia), and OA is based in New York City; does it ever shock you to see how far your music has spread?

A: I’m so happy about it! I’d never thought I’d look at my Spotify stats and see listeners from the US and UK, so that’s very exciting.

 

Q: Are there any Australian based artists us overseas fans should have an eye on?

A: A fellow Brisbane local and one of my friends Golden Vessel, his stuff is stellar! I would also recommend checking out T. Scarlett and Marco, we work on a lot of music together, and they’re also Brisbane boys!

 

Q: You’re about a year into your career now, is there anything you’ve learned since being in this position? Is there any advice you could give up & coming musicians?

A: I think the biggest thing I’ve learnt is to have all the patience in the world. I’m quite young for what I do so I tend to get ahead of myself a lot of the time. I find that stepping back sometimes and living in the moment is refreshingly healthy and helps my creativity.

 

Q: Lastly, is there anything you would like to tell your supporters?

A: Thanks so much for the love, new music very very soon!


If you enjoyed the interview and would like to continue to support Tokyo, be sure to follow him on Instagram & SoundCloud.
If you would like to hear his latest song, “Little Things” feat. DVNA – click here.

Meet London Based R&B Vocalist: Bassette. “It’s scary releasing something you’ve created…”

In today’s interview, I get the chance to speak with Bermudian vocalist, Bassette. The singer, currently based in London, has been around for about three years and after a small hiatus, is preparing for a major comeback early next year. In this interview, we discuss the struggles of debuting, the journey of finding her voice, and what’s inspired her from the start.
Enjoy the interview 🙂


Before we begin, would you like to introduce yourself?

A: My name is Bassette, I’m 24 years old. I’m originally from Bermuda but, I’m based in London. I sing, write songs, laugh a lot and procrastinate too much!



Q: How would you describe your sound for those who have yet to hear your music?

A: Dreamy, bassy, lazy Sunday vibes…



Q: Your songs are generally about love & the complexity of it – why do you think you gravitate towards this topic? Where do you usually grab inspiration for these songs?

A: Everyone and anyone around me. I’m a good listener so my inspiration comes from friends, stories or situations mainly and also growing watching too many Jerry Springer episodes, observing trash relationships. (lol)


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Q: Your latest song “Bermuda” – which you’ve described as a “celebration of wholehearted love” has received praises being called “infectious” and “tranquil”. As someone involved in 100% of your music, what is it like to hear praises like that?

 

A: It feels great to be honest! It’s scary releasing something you’ve created or taken part in creating, you don’t know how it’s going to be received. Just because you like it, others may not and that’s OK but it’s a long process from the creation of the song to actually releasing it so when it’s received well and given it’s praises it makes the whole process worth it.

 

Q: For a period of time, London did not have any major artists producing R&B music, which is the category you tend to work around. I’m curious as to who some of your musical influences were growing up.

A: Lauryn Hill, Amy Winehouse, Destiny’s Child and later on The Weeknd & Frank Ocean plus lots more!

 

 

Q: You’ve stated that you only started pursuing music while in university. Was music always a “what if” type of career (dream career) in your mind, or was there a specific moment that you realized you wanted to do it professionally? Did your family support this decision?

A: I’ve grown up knowing I was going to be a singer, I just didn’t know how or whether it was realistic. My family wanted me to go down the route of school: university, get a job but I wasn’t feeling that so I thought London is the best place to be to pursue music.

My parents wanted me to go to university so, for them I went to university, for me I chose universities in London so I could start to focus on my music. Here is where I found my first manager, started going studio & writing writing writing.

About 2 years into my move to London, I just didn’t want to be at university anymore, I was there for the wrong reasons so I left and decided to focus wholeheartedly on the music. My family are my biggest fans now!

 

Q: The first time we heard music from you was in 2015, with the song “Cool Waters” which received buzz from indie music platforms (such as this) – what was the experience of writing and releasing your first song like? – were you nervous?

A: Wow! Cool Water is still one of my faves actually but I’ve removed it from online.

With my first releases, I would just write in my room, so I have notebooks and notebooks filled with lyrics and ideas. I would take my lyric and melody ideas to a producer and they’d work their magic and make it into a song.

With my first EP (which is not available online anymore) I was still finding my sound and who I was as an artist so I feel it was incomplete and wasn’t synchronised or the best I could do, so I removed it. One song from my first EP is still online though.

Yes! I’m always nervous when it comes to releases and everything else.. I’m just a nervous person lol

 

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Q: You followed that up with the release of your debut project Midnight Sounds. How did that project come about?

A: Yes, Cool Water was part of the Midnight Sound EP, which was released late 2015. I just wanted to release a body of work to be honest but again, I didn’t really understand my sound or where I was at musically so felt it was a bit rushed! I’ve removed it now!

 

Q: Around this time, London had been experiencing a new wave of artists, specifically in R&B, did you ever feel pressured into “fitting” the sound or did it influence you even more to get your music out there?

A: It definitely influenced me more to get out there.

 

Q: You followed up the project with a string of collaborations: “Playing for You” with producer Joe Hertz, “Boys with Guitars” ft. IshDARR & “Boys with Guitars” (Version 2) featuring Ms. Banks. Do you enjoy collaborating? Are there any artists you currently want to collab with?

 

A: Yes, I love collaborating. You can give two artists the same beat and the end results will sound completely different because each person adds their own personality and flavour so I love working with other people and hearing their ideas.

I would love to work with Beyoncé of course. Even just observing how she works, her creative process and learning her work ethic!

 


Q: Speaking of “Boys with Guitars” – what inspired you to release two versions? Did you specifically reach out to these artists for a collaboration?

A: Yes, we reached out to both and loved what both of them did on the track so release both versions.

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Q: After “Boys with Guitars”, we were hit with “Bermuda” which we spoke about earlier.

If I’m correct, this is the first visual you’ve released to accompany your music. What was the process of recording a music video like?

 


A: It was fun! I whole different world to what I’m used to! I’m grateful to Bossy Ldn who curated the video, we based the video off of their mood board so it was really cool to see their mood board some to life at the shoot.

Jack A Bowden directed the video with his team, so it was just fun vibes and positive attitudes all around. Ash Halliburton was the creative direction and built the set as we went along so all scenes were shot in one studio and built on the day! It’s pretty amazing now that I look back on it.

 

Q: As someone who’s been active for around 3 years now, I’m curious to know what part about being an artist is the most gratifying?

A: I love when people cover my songs! Like wow, you liked it enough to learn the lyrics and make a cover video! I always love watching them and I love seeing dance choreography to my songs as well.

Also, I love hearing the final product. When ideas you’ve had in your head have come alive!

 


Q: What are some things you’ve learned since getting in this position? Are there any words of wisdom you can give aspiring musicians when it comes to patience, work ethic, etc.?

A: Accept help from others, teamwork makes things happen. Remember that you see the finished product, artists don’t expose the hard work, time & effort that goes into a release

 


Q: You’ve remained relatively quiet for 2018 but is there anything we should be excited for within the year – early next year?

A: Yes! I have a whole project coming out during the early parts of next year! it’s actually done, we just need to sprinkle some extra sauce on each track. We’ll have our next single out early next year!

 

Q: Is there anything you would like to tell your supporters?

A: There’s lots of new music coming, bangin!


If you enjoyed the interview and would like to hear some of the music featured:

Make sure to stay updated with Bassette: Instagram, Twitter, SoundCloud

Meet Upcoming Singer/Songwriter: SLCHLD. “I shouldn’t box myself in a certain music industry.”

In today’s interview I had the pleasure of speaking with upcoming singer/songwriter – SLCHLD. Personally, I’ve been listening to SLCHLD since the beginning of his career and over the last year he has grown into one of my favorite artists coming out of Canada. Originally from South Korea, he has been able to combine both his eastern and western influences and create a sound of his own. In this interview I got the chance to speak with him about the responsibilities of being an entertainer, his evolution as an artist, and much more…

Enjoy 🙂


Q: Before we start, would you like to introduce yourself?

A: Hello, my name is Doohyuk Jang, but I go by the alias Seoulchild (stylized as SLCHLD). I am a 22 year old vocalist based in Canada and Korea. I have yet to make an official release, but I am preparing to make a debut EP sometime soon.

 

 


Q: You’ve only been out a year but because of your work ethic SO much has happened. Is music a career you’ve always seen yourself being in?

A: Honestly I had no idea I would be where I am today back when I started. I originally just rapped with my friends for fun, but when I started singing, that’s when I took music seriously. I don’t know if I will be doing music forever because of how harsh the music industry is run today, but that is my goal as of right now.

 


Q: Is there anyone in your family also into music or are you the first?

A: I guess my whole family did music at some point. My dad often told me and my family about when he used to be in a rock band, and I thought that was cool. My mother used to do Traditional Korean Folk Music, which included instruments such as 장구 (Janggu) and 꽹과리 (Kkwaenggwari). As for my brother, he used to play the clarinet and the alto saxophone in school.

 


Q: What was their reaction when you decided to become a musician?

A: I used to work as a Graphic Designer at company before I started music. They were hesitant at first because I was just about to begin a legit career, but they were supportive later on when I showed how much music meant to me.

 

 

Q: You’ve made music in a list of genres, but often times record R&B records— I’m curious, who were some of your influences growing up?

A: Growing up I listened to a variety of music. My brother used to fill my MP3 up when I was little and it had some hits from the old days such as Britney Spears’ “Toxic”, Seotaeji’s ‘난 알아요’, and Chris Brown’s ‘Superhuman’. Back in middle school, Taylor Swift was the hot trend among friends so I listened to her a lot as well. I’d say Jason Mraz and Justin Timberlake were the two artists I adored the most back then.

 

 

Q: When you initially began looking into music were you already skilled in the writing/singing area or did you have to hone your craft?

A: Oh no, I was terrible when I started. When I first started making music, I thought that I had to make complex lyrics and rhyme schemes, and didn’t pay too much attention to how much soul I was putting into them. Writing songs was a huge, but fun learning curve for me to get better at and it still is today.

 


Q: Are there any tips you could give aspiring artists when it comes to developing their sound?

A: I know this might not apply for every aspiring artists, but I’d say you should make your art shine in a way you would like it to be. It’s okay to be influenced by the accomplished artists you look up to, but you should always put what you want first when shaping it. I used to think that I had to make hits and songs that the audience would for sure enjoy, but now I just make what I want and try to connect with fans who relate to them.

 

 

Q: In an interview with Inspire Me Korea, you mention that when you started out, several musicians gave you advice in terms of your music and artistry — is there any piece of advice that stuck out to you the most?

A: Some musicians that I got to meet that are in the mainstream often told me that I should incorporate more Korean lyrics to my music. That honestly stressed me out because I’m more a person who writes what I feel at that time and state, and I feel that I express those feelings better in English. I was stuck at one point due to this advice I received, but later realized that I shouldn’t box myself in a certain music industry. In more ways or another, I am thankful for this advice.

 

 

 

Q: Since your debut you’ve released music, several projects, and a couple of features — what’s been your “favorite responsibility” since transitioning into an artist (so far)?

A: It’s all about the vibes that are created in the process. I enjoy doing features when I’m with the artist I’m doing it with. We share ideas and brainstorm what we want to say and align each others directions towards the collaboration. When I made ‘when I leave’ with GILLA, oceanfromtheblue, and RNMK, we were just bouncing off ideas back and forth and it was so much fun. Same goes for when I work with producers. When I work on my personal projects I sometimes force myself into a state I don’t want to be in to draw out what I want to sing. It’s sometimes painful, fun, and sad, but that’s why I love music. I’d say my favorite responsibility since transitioning into an artist would be trying to satisfy myself with what I am doing to the fullest.

 

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Q: Your debut came in January 2017 with the release of your first project Motel, do you remember the feeling you got once you released it?

A: That was a fun project. Takes me back haha. Back then I didn’t know what I was getting into, it was just a project I made for fun. When it got highlighted on popular YouTube Music Channels (shout out to my good friends over at WLK, and Daniel from Danielions music) everything felt surreal. I enjoyed every moment and sometimes I wish I could go back to enjoying music like that.

 


Q: What was it like for you to hear the finished project in its final form?

A: It was beautiful. My first ever project, so it had to feel amazing right? Haha. Although I didn’t have vast knowledge of mixing or mastering tracks back then, I tried to pay attention to detail to the best of my knowledge and I was satisfied when it was completed.

 

 

Q: Since Motel, you have released The Sadness Inside You, Wisdom & Prayer, and Emotions. How have you evolved as an artist with each project?

A: I sometimes forget I released that many projects wow.

The Sadness Inside You was my approach on the lo-fi genre and was an essential catalyst that helped me grow as a songwriter.

I consider Wisdom & Prayer as a letter to my future self, telling me that I shouldn’t get drunk in fame or money if I ever was to blow up.

Emotions was a painful, but fun project for me. It’s a project about stepping into the adult world, having responsibilities, and reflecting upon my mistakes and actions. The way I wrote most of my lyrics there are in riddles, something that many people might not have known.

 

Q: Do you have a favorite song off of each project? If so, which ones and why?

A:

The whole process of making the song probably took no less than 30 minutes, and initially I was doubtful because I thought I didn’t put hard work into it. But I grew into loving it and realised that time is a subjective matter when it comes to making music.

  • Wisdom & Prayer – “Prayer

I don’t listen to my own songs a lot, but I still listen to this song because it’s a reminder for me to be a person who takes control of my responsibilities.

This is the outro track of the mixtape. I express that I shouldn’t give up on what I want to do or achieve, and if I face failures, I should grow from it. It’s a song that reminds you to love yourself.

 

 

Q: You took a short hiatus earlier in this year – were you able to relax and refocus? Why did you think you needed the break?

A: As I mentioned earlier, when I receive the advice of trying to incorporate Korean lyrics I was puzzled and was lost. I was never satisfied with what I was doing. I initially had a EP finished and ready to release it, but I eventually scrapped the whole project because I hated the fact that some of the tracks in it weren’t my real expressions.

 

 

Q: With every release, do you feel pressured to make every song as good as the last? Does it ever get difficult to remain creative?

A: I can’t lie about this and yes, the pressure is always there. However, there are times when I make a song and I feel that it was my best song so far. And whether that certain song or project blows up or not, I am satisfied.

 

 

Q: You’ve announced that you’re almost halfway finished with your latest project, do you have a name for it yet? What should we expect to hear on it?

A: There is a name planned, and I think it’s a great name (won’t spoil it just yet!). There aren’t a lot of features on the EP, mostly it’s just me and my producer GILLA. A lot of the topics I discuss on the project are my adventures this past year and how my view changed from then to now. I hope y’all enjoy it!

 

 

Q: What are some goals you are hoping to achieve by the end of 2018?

A: My goal last year was to hit a 1000 followers on Soundcloud, and now I’m somewhere between 10,000 or whatsoever. This year, I just want to put out the EP, with no regrets. I honestly don’t expect it to go big or anything, but nonetheless I want to release the project with me in it 100%.

 

Q: Lastly, is there anything you would like to tell your supporters?
A: I love all of you. Each and everyone that supports me. I apologize if I sometimes make abrupt decisions but I thank you for supporting me throughout this one hell of a ride of being a musician. I will hit you guys back with new updates soon!


To stay updated with SLCHLD make sure to follow him on Instagram!

Also, make sure to listen to his latest singles “Wednesday Girl” and “Hollywood